<< >>
  1. reportagebygettyimages:

    "What are the advantages of using an iPhone?"

    Photojournalist Benjamin Lowy talks to Richard Aedy, of the Australian Broadcasting Company Radio Network, about the virtues of using a mobile phone in the field. In the above video, Lowy, who has made mobile-phone images while working in Libya, Afghanistan, and his own backyard of New York City, explains how he chooses the right tool for the job. As for the question above, Lowy says:

    When you shoot with an SLR or rangefinder or any type of camera, you’re taking this huge black box and throwing it in front of your face. And you’re blocking out your ability to interact with your subject. Sometimes that can be good if you need if you need to cut your empathy off, so like if you’re at a funeral and you need to pull yourself emotionally out of a situation. But a lot of times I’m just talking to someone out on the street, and all of the sudden I am cutting the level of empathy and the level of interaction and intimacy with people by putting a camera against your face. So by using the phone I can keep eye contact with the people I’m photographing.

    Hear more segments from ABC RN’s ‘Media Report’ on the shows website.

    (via benlowy)

    1 month ago  /  124 notes

  2. trentgilliss:

    Wow, this is groovy: Questlove breaking down the rhythm tracks of the original multitrack studio recordings of Marvin Gaye’s single “What’s Going On.”

    “What’s so cool about it is that this is one of the most undefined drum songs of soul music. I don’t think of drums when I think of ‘What’s Going On.” I think of the conga, but I always felt like it was a ritual syncopated…

    I always wondered though why didn’t they just bring the… like, it could’ve been a whole different song had the drums just been the force of it, but I guess that would’ve taken away from it.

    And here Questlove discusses how he thinks of “What’s Going On” as a winter song and the perfection of its “crude harmonies”:

    And here they break down how the single was recorded nine months prior to the release of the album, the piano being used as a percussion line, and the “infamous football players”:

    (Big thanks to Mikel Elcessor of WDET to turning me on to this.)

    1 year ago  /  43 notes

  3. reportagebygettyimages:

The latest cover of Time, ‘Lessons from the Storm,’ was shot with an iPhone by Ben Lowy.  

    reportagebygettyimages:

    The latest cover of Time, ‘Lessons from the Storm,’ was shot with an iPhone by Ben Lowy.  

    (via benlowy)

    1 year ago  /  1,019 notes

  4. behindhipstaland:

Day one of Adventures In HipstaLand :: Roni’s Gayo Coffee Story.

    behindhipstaland:

    Day one of Adventures In HipstaLand :: Roni’s Gayo Coffee Story.

    1 year ago  /  55 notes

  5. behindhipstaland:

Multiple Exposure Kit: How to take multiple exposure shots like a pro


After you download the Multiple Exposure Kit in the Hipstamart, getting started is super simple—just follow this three-step process:
Slide the Multi-Exposure switch all the way to the left
Take a picture
Take another picture
It’s as easy as that!

Once you’ve taken the second shot, the viewfinder window will remain closed for a few seconds as the image begins to process. Once the viewfinder window reopens, you can then shoot another multiple exposure shot by sliding the switch to the left again. 

Shoot Like a Pro
Want to take your multiple exposure shots from “so-so” to superb? Follow these awesome pro tips:

Pro Tip #1 - Try rotating your device between shots - turn it left or right 90 degrees or even turn it up-side-down. Hipstamatic remembers the correct orientation of each exposure and will combine them that way into the final image.

Pro Tip #2 - Change your mind midstream about which lens or film you want to use? No problem. You can switch gear between exposures! Hipstamatic will process your final image using the gear that’s selected when the last image is taken. You can even use Shake-to-Randomize in-between shots, for more serendipitous results.

Pro Tip #3 - Multi-Exposure doesn’t mean just two images… it can mean as many as you like. After taking a shot, just push the Multi-Exposure slider from the middle position all the way to the left again to enable it to add yet another exposure to your image.

    behindhipstaland:

    Multiple Exposure Kit: How to take multiple exposure shots like a pro

    After you download the Multiple Exposure Kit in the Hipstamart, getting started is super simple—just follow this three-step process:
    1. Slide the Multi-Exposure switch all the way to the left
    2. Take a picture
    3. Take another picture
    It’s as easy as that!
    Once you’ve taken the second shot, the viewfinder window will remain closed for a few seconds as the image begins to process. Once the viewfinder window reopens, you can then shoot another multiple exposure shot by sliding the switch to the left again. 
    Shoot Like a Pro
    Want to take your multiple exposure shots from “so-so” to superb? Follow these awesome pro tips:
    Pro Tip #1 - Try rotating your device between shots - turn it left or right 90 degrees or even turn it up-side-down. Hipstamatic remembers the correct orientation of each exposure and will combine them that way into the final image.
    Pro Tip #2 - Change your mind midstream about which lens or film you want to use? No problem. You can switch gear between exposures! Hipstamatic will process your final image using the gear that’s selected when the last image is taken. You can even use Shake-to-Randomize in-between shots, for more serendipitous results.
    Pro Tip #3 - Multi-Exposure doesn’t mean just two images… it can mean as many as you like. After taking a shot, just push the Multi-Exposure slider from the middle position all the way to the left again to enable it to add yet another exposure to your image.

    1 year ago  /  112 notes

  6. diptic:

Layover My Diptic Contest
We recently released our second photography app, Layover, which lets you blend up to five pictures to create interesting, artistic (and sometimes hilarious!) images. In celebration of Layover, we are holding a Layover and Diptic contest. 
Layover and Diptic, while each is fantastic on its own, can be combined to create remarkable and imaginative pieces of art. 
You can create a Diptic and then edit it in Layover, or edit images in Layover and pop them into Diptic. You can do whatever you want as long as you use both Diptic and Layover. 
The winner of the contest will receive a $200 iTunes gift card. Pretty sweet, right?
Due to legal restrictions, the contest is open only to U.S. residents who have reached the age of majority in their jurisdiction of residence at the time of entry and who do NOT reside in Arizona, New Jersey or Vermont. 
To enter, post your submissions to Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #LayoverMyDiptic. Or, you can email them to us at contest@dipticapp.com.
We’ll post submissions here so everyone can see them. After the contest closes, we will review all entries and announce the winner on October 15, 2012.
Time frame: Contest Begins: August 28 2012 at 9 a.m. PST Contest Ends: October 8, 2012 at 12 a.m. PST
Our judging will be based on: Creativity, aesthetics, and best use of Diptic and Layover. 
Prize: $200 iTunes Gift Card. 
Additional details:
Images submitted should have at least two frames.
Images must be edited using Layover and Diptic.
App stacking is okay, but it needs to be obvious that Diptic and Layover were used in each entry.
By entering, you agree to the contest Terms &amp; Conditions.
If you have any questions, ask @dipticapp or @Layoverapp on Twitter or email contest@dipticapp.com.

    diptic:

    Layover My Diptic Contest

    We recently released our second photography app, Layover, which lets you blend up to five pictures to create interesting, artistic (and sometimes hilarious!) images. In celebration of Layover, we are holding a Layover and Diptic contest.

    Layover and Diptic, while each is fantastic on its own, can be combined to create remarkable and imaginative pieces of art.

    You can create a Diptic and then edit it in Layover, or edit images in Layover and pop them into Diptic. You can do whatever you want as long as you use both Diptic and Layover.

    The winner of the contest will receive a $200 iTunes gift card. Pretty sweet, right?

    Due to legal restrictions, the contest is open only to U.S. residents who have reached the age of majority in their jurisdiction of residence at the time of entry and who do NOT reside in Arizona, New Jersey or Vermont.

    To enter, post your submissions to Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #LayoverMyDiptic. Or, you can email them to us at contest@dipticapp.com.

    We’ll post submissions here so everyone can see them. After the contest closes, we will review all entries and announce the winner on October 15, 2012.

    Time frame:
    Contest Begins: August 28 2012 at 9 a.m. PST
    Contest Ends: October 8, 2012 at 12 a.m. PST

    Our judging will be based on:
    Creativity, aesthetics, and best use of Diptic and Layover.

    Prize: $200 iTunes Gift Card.

    Additional details:

    • Images submitted should have at least two frames.
    • Images must be edited using Layover and Diptic.
    • App stacking is okay, but it needs to be obvious that Diptic and Layover were used in each entry.
    • By entering, you agree to the contest Terms & Conditions.

    If you have any questions, ask @dipticapp or @Layoverapp on Twitter or email contest@dipticapp.com.

    2 years ago  /  1 note

  7. storyboard:

    Capturing Libya: Through a Hipstamatic Lens

    To photojournalism purists, it was pure blasphemy: a prestigious prize, third place for photo of the year, granted to a New York Times photographer who’d used not a 35mm to document U.S. soldiers in Iraq, but simply, his iPhone — and an app called Hipstamatic. Immediately, traditionalists went berserk: “What we knew as photojournalism at its purest form is over,” one photojournalist lamented. Using Hipstamatic in a news report, another commentator proclaimed, was “cheating us all.”

    And yet, to Ben Lowy, a conflict photographer who has made a career out of a certain brand of iPhonography — and will debut the first ever photojournalism-inspired Hipstamatic lens with his namesake later this year — the award was a well-needed wake-up call for photo fundamentalists. Last February, Lowy set out to capture the uprising in Libya from his iPhone, alongside millions of protesters who’d document the Arab Spring on their mobile devices. In October, Lowy’s Hipstamatic images of everyday life in wartime Kabul were published in the New York Times Magazine, prompting the magazine’s photo editor, Kathy Ryan, to defend their use on the paper’s 6th Floor blog. And since then, Lowy has published an iPhone photo a day — from dramatic images of war to mundane life in Brooklyn — on his Tumblr, captured under the title, iSee.

    Read More

    2 years ago  /  2,349 notes

  8. lensblr-network:

(Self Portrait, 2012.) Kelly / 21 / Minneapolis / Burgeoning photographer &amp; writer

    lensblr-network:

    (Self Portrait, 2012.) Kelly / 21 / Minneapolis / Burgeoning photographer & writer

    2 years ago  /  22 notes

Tweetline by
Marcus Mo